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Korea independence movement in the Japanese colonial period

Paper instructions:
writing: any thoughts on and significance of Korean independence movement and protestantism during the Japanese colonial period
                                     Korean Independence Movement and Protestantism
Under Japanese Colonial government, Koreans were stripped of the freedom of speech, association, press, and assembly. For Koreans stripped of any conventional means to oppose Japanese colonial rule, the church and Protestantism turned out to be the means for raising their joint liberation aspirations.
At the dusk of the nineteenth century, an aspiration to modernize and reform on the side of Koreans overlapped with the emergence of Protestantism; consequently, progressive national independence movement was formed under these exceptional historical conditions (Park, 2009). The swift expansion of Protestantism at this time not only meant an increase in the number of churches and converts, but also an ideological and organizational expansion of Korean independence movement.
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At the time, the church was the strongest and most influential organization in colonial Korea. It served as a place for relief for the many Koreans who had long been oppressed by the Japanese. In the church, Koreans could assemble, communicate freely and organize the base for Korean independence movement (Park, 2009). Since a majority of Koreans were Protestants, Protestantism exerted great influence on the political life of Koreans. As one of the very few associations allowed by the Japanese Colonial government to operate in Korea, the Protestant church attracted the attention political activists who had little interest in religious goals.
The Koreans were attracted to Christianity not only because of their trivial existence and socio-political denial but also because of their desire to find public expression in spiritual terms. Indeed, Koreans’ social and political aspiration for liberation was nearly indissoluble from their warm reaction to Christian ideologies. Protestantism would later become to be identified with national struggle against the parallel Japanese control.
Japan suppressed Korea through its colonial government. Koreans were denied the basic rights of speech, press, association, and assembly. For these suppressed Koreans the increasing number of Protestant churches became the only places they were allowed to exercise these rights. The churches thus drew the attention of revolutionists who had very little interest in religious matters.

                                                                   Reference
Park, C. (2009). Protestantism and politics in Korea. Washington: University of Washington  Press.

Korea independence movement in the Japanese colonial period

Paper instructions:
writing: any thoughts on and significance of Korean independence movement and protestantism during the Japanese colonial period
                                     Korean Independence Movement and Protestantism
Under Japanese Colonial government, Koreans were stripped of the freedom of speech, association, press, and assembly. For Koreans stripped of any conventional means to oppose Japanese colonial rule, the church and Protestantism turned out to be the means for raising their joint liberation aspirations.
At the dusk of the nineteenth century, an aspiration to modernize and reform on the side of Koreans overlapped with the emergence of Protestantism; consequently, progressive national independence movement was formed under these exceptional historical conditions (Park, 2009). The swift expansion of Protestantism at this time not only meant an increase in the number of churches and converts, but also an ideological and organizational expansion of Korean independence movement.
CLICK HERE FOR HELP ON THIS PAPER…………………….
At the time, the church was the strongest and most influential organization in colonial Korea. It served as a place for relief for the many Koreans who had long been oppressed by the Japanese. In the church, Koreans could assemble, communicate freely and organize the base for Korean independence movement (Park, 2009). Since a majority of Koreans were Protestants, Protestantism exerted great influence on the political life of Koreans. As one of the very few associations allowed by the Japanese Colonial government to operate in Korea, the Protestant church attracted the attention political activists who had little interest in religious goals.
The Koreans were attracted to Christianity not only because of their trivial existence and socio-political denial but also because of their desire to find public expression in spiritual terms. Indeed, Koreans’ social and political aspiration for liberation was nearly indissoluble from their warm reaction to Christian ideologies. Protestantism would later become to be identified with national struggle against the parallel Japanese control.
Japan suppressed Korea through its colonial government. Koreans were denied the basic rights of speech, press, association, and assembly. For these suppressed Koreans the increasing number of Protestant churches became the only places they were allowed to exercise these rights. The churches thus drew the attention of revolutionists who had very little interest in religious matters.

                                                                   Reference
Park, C. (2009). Protestantism and politics in Korea. Washington: University of Washington  Press.

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