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It sounds similar to the Australian system regarding the role of public and private sector: I wonder if their system is better in terms of accessibility to primary health care, as that’s sometimes a problem in Australia which increases pressure on hospitals. Also, the commissioning role sounds similar to what Medicare Locals are doing in terms of assessing needs of local populations? Another similarity I thought between the Aust. system and NHS is the articulation of rights. While it’s not in the Australian constitution, an Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights exist https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/national-priorities/charter-of-healthcare-rights/ Discuss the similarity and the difference between NHS and Australia this is my answer for Discussion Question 1 In any jurisdiction, the quality of healthcare offered to the people largely determines the success of the region. In a way, quality healthcare is one of the most fundamental human needs. Healthcare systems vary across several regions in the world. In a single country, for instance, several states might develop their own systems of providing healthcare to the people. In the United Kingdom healthcare is devolved and each country privately funds its own system. While the healthcare system in England has faced several challenges over the years, it has also made several strides on various quarters. In England, healthcare is provided by the National Health Service (NHS) and is funded from the public coffers. Ten Strategic Health Authorities have been established to provide the actual delivery of the healthcare services to the people. In addition, private healthcare thrives well in England is mostly paid by private insurance. There is a kind of cross over between the private sector healthcare and the public sector healthcare. This is done with a sole objective of bettering the services delivered to the people. For many English people, healthcare is usually delivered in a basic or primary healthcare setting. Much of NHS funding is directed to hospitals since they provide much specialized and complex care compared to the provide trusts which have also been established as care deliverers. The hospitals own assets which are mostly purchased by the state by held in trust by the institutions. One success in this healthcare system is the aspect of commissioning. In this case, eve the ordinary doctors in rural settings are granted the ability to identify particular pressing needs in their communities and commissioning activities that can help address the challenges. In addition, majority of the population have access to primary care in the form of general practitioners such as dentists, pharmacists and optometrists. On the other hand, the people can also access secondary care in the form of emergency of elective care. This is provided by both the public and the private sectors. It is also realized that the NHS has a constitution which clearly outlines the rights and obligations of practitioners and patients. Many of these obligations are legally enforceable and this has worked well in sanitizing the healthcare system across England. The NHS enjoys a great deal of popular support across the country with most surveys indicating high levels of both staff and patient satisfaction. The bulk of this support is usually displayed with regard to hospital in-patients. Majority of inpatients are satisfied with the services they receive from the health institutions. While the NHS has been successful in its operations on many fronts, a number of areas still need to be addressed in order to make the services even better. On most surveys conducted, it has been noted that most patients are not fully satisfied with the services offered under Accident and Emergency departments in most institutions. The NHS should therefore ensure that every health facility is fully equipped and staffed to handle emergency situations in the most appropriate way. While the NHS has made strides in this respect, a number of bottlenecks still stand in the way. It therefore calls for greater funding and support from other stakeholders. In sum, it is seen that the healthcare system in England is equitable as it caters well for every citizen. Greig, R. (2006). Government policy in England: inclusion in mainstream healthcare. Psychiatry, 5(9), 295-297.

It sounds similar to the Australian system regarding the role of public and private sector: I wonder if their system is better in terms of accessibility to primary health care, as that’s sometimes a problem in Australia which increases pressure on hospitals.

Also, the commissioning role sounds similar to what Medicare Locals are doing in terms of assessing needs of local populations?

Another similarity I thought between the Aust. system and NHS is the articulation of rights. While it’s not in the Australian constitution, an Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights exist https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/national-priorities/charter-of-healthcare-rights/
Discuss the similarity and the difference between NHS and Australia

this is my answer for Discussion Question 1

In any jurisdiction, the quality of healthcare offered to the people largely determines the success of the region. In a way, quality healthcare is one of the most fundamental human needs. Healthcare systems vary across several regions in the world. In a single country, for instance, several states might develop their own systems of providing healthcare to the people. In the United Kingdom healthcare is devolved and each country privately funds its own system. While the healthcare system in England has faced several challenges over the years, it has also made several strides on various quarters. In England, healthcare is provided by the National Health Service (NHS) and is funded from the public coffers.

Ten Strategic Health Authorities have been established to provide the actual delivery of the healthcare services to the people. In addition, private healthcare thrives well in England is mostly paid by private insurance. There is a kind of cross over between the private sector healthcare and the public sector healthcare. This is done with a sole objective of bettering the services delivered to the people. For many English people, healthcare is usually delivered in a basic or primary healthcare setting. Much of NHS funding is directed to hospitals since they provide much specialized and complex care compared to the provide trusts which have also been established as care deliverers. The hospitals own assets which are mostly purchased by the state by held in trust by the institutions.

One success in this healthcare system is the aspect of commissioning. In this case, eve the ordinary doctors in rural settings are granted the ability to identify particular pressing needs in their communities and commissioning activities that can help address the challenges. In addition, majority of the population have access to primary care in the form of general practitioners such as dentists, pharmacists and optometrists. On the other hand, the people can also access secondary care in the form of emergency of elective care. This is provided by both the public and the private sectors.

It is also realized that the NHS has a constitution which clearly outlines the rights and obligations of practitioners and patients. Many of these obligations are legally enforceable and this has worked well in sanitizing the healthcare system across England. The NHS enjoys a great deal of popular support across the country with most surveys indicating high levels of both staff and patient satisfaction. The bulk of this support is usually displayed with regard to hospital in-patients. Majority of inpatients are satisfied with the services they receive from the health institutions. While the NHS has been successful in its operations on many fronts, a number of areas still need to be addressed in order to make the services even better. On most surveys conducted, it has been noted that most patients are not fully satisfied with the services offered under Accident and Emergency departments in most institutions. The NHS should therefore ensure that every health facility is fully equipped and staffed to handle emergency situations in the most appropriate way. While the NHS has made strides in this respect, a number of bottlenecks still stand in the way. It therefore calls for greater funding and support from other stakeholders. In sum, it is seen that the healthcare system in England is equitable as it caters well for every citizen.

Greig, R. (2006). Government policy in England: inclusion in mainstream healthcare. Psychiatry, 5(9), 295-297.

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