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Instructions Part 2: 9 Pages, use the 8 sources from the annotated bibliography provided below. Also below is the thesis and feel of the work, use that feel and thesis. This paper must reflect knowledge of course content and critical thinking. The main body of the work will begin with an introductory paragraph that articulates a succinct thesis statement and will conclude with a restatement of the thesis and summary conclusion paragraph, followed by a Reference page listing all sources used and the annotated bibliography developed earlier in the course. Any images and tables used must be placed in an Appendix section following the Annotated Bibliography and are not considered part of the paper body content. Below are required subheadings to be included in the main body of the paper. Theorist Biography:A succinct biography of the theorist two to three pages in length and relevant to the purpose of the paper. Contributions:A two to three page detailed explanation of the theorist’s most important contributions to the field and description of the theorist’s empirical research methodologies. Evaluation:A two to three page critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations of your selected theorist’s theory. Personal Response:A one to two page personal response to how you see the components of the theory you selected in operation in your everyday life. This should not be a discussion of your personal life, but a selection of concepts applied to your life as you see them through the eyes/concepts of the theorist. How does each concept apply to your life? Carl Ransom Rogers and Annotated Bibliography Thesis: Carl Rogers’ theory of the self is an effective approach to clinical psychological therapy The founder of humanistic psychology, Carl Rogers was an American psychologist who developed a ground breaking theory of personality development, and created the person-centered or client-centered therapy in understanding personality, behavior, and human relations. He was born on January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois, Chicago. He started as Agriculture major then to religion in the University of Wisconsin before finally shifting to psychology at Columbia University. He cultivated his humanistic theory of personal development while dealing with abused children at the Rochester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Roger’s Theory of Personality Development provides a broad array of explanations for behavior and the constitution of a person. It starts off with Maslow’s theory that all people possess the natural inclination to continue to grow and develop towards one’s self-actualization. At the core of this pursuit, is the concept of the ‘self’ which serves as the central component in developing and modifying human personality. The self refers to the sum of the multifaceted dynamic system of beliefs, attitudes and opinions that a person learns in time about one’s personal existence. It has three components namely: self-worth, self-image and ideal self. People aim to attain the ideal self, but more often than not, one’s real self diverges from the ideal self which is called incongruence. To achieve this, a person requires “unconditional positive regard from others” and “high self worth”. An “unconditional positive regard “ refers to the unqualified acceptance and love provided the people surrounding an individual, which provides a person strength and confidence try things out, commit mistakes, and bounce back from mistakes. A “high self worth” is characterized by confidence, faith in oneself, and positive feelings about oneself that one develops in life primarily through one’s interaction with parents. This allows one to have the strength to face challenges in life or accept failure and disappointments. A person with a high self-worth and who receives “unconditional positive regard” becomes a fully functioning person towards attaining optimal development or the good life. Roger’s client-centered approach is another important contribution in the field of therapy and counseling. It is characterized by clients directing the progress of the therapy that is designed or built around the client, and it refrains from imposing an authoritative analysis in understanding and providing counseling to clients. This approach proactively engages patients to lead them to discover solutions of their problems by themselves, while the therapist only provides guidance. The therapist must have the qualities of congruence, empathy and unconditional positive regard to succeed. “Unconditional positive regard” of the therapist towards the client is attained through “reflection”, whereby the therapist persistently reaffirms what his client freely expresses in an attempt to demonstrate one’s complete acceptance of the client and facilitate self-realization and acknowledgement of any hidden or unconscious negative feelings that he or she may have. Therapy involves helping the client to better understand himself thereby allowing him to define his own problem and determine his own solution. Rogers’ client centered approaches have been commonly applied in counseling for marriage, parent child relationships and in education, e.g. learner-centered teaching. For his professional work and contribution in the field of psychology, Carl Rogers has been distinguished as an important and eminent authority in the field of psychology, whose humanistic theories and therapies continued to be practiced and followed today and for generations to come. Annotated Bibliography Rogers, C. (2012). On Becoming a Person: A Therapist’s View of Psychotherapy. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt The founder of the humanistic psychology, Carl Rogers revolutionized psychotherapy with his “client-centered therapy”, which has become a standard component in conventional psychology. The book included an introduction by Peter Kramer which place’s Roger’s work in modern context to elaborate on its continuing relevance and importance in today’s psychology in relation to modern psychopharmacological drugs that has recently blurred the psychotherapeutic relationship. He noted the modern trend that brings back the importance of the therapeutic encounter where Roger’s “client-centered therapy” is central. As one the pioneer therapists to delve into the therapeutic process, Roger provided investigates a therapist’s personal insights to the client form a psychodynamic standpoint of conveyance and vice versa. The rest of the book on the other hand, outlined Roger’s original Client-centered Therapy which among others tackles the prospects and obstacles to personal development, the nature of change, and the real meaning of therapeutic relations. Farber, B. A., Brink, D.C. & Raskin, P.M. (Eds) (1996) The Psychotherapy of Carl Rogers: Cases and Commentary. New York, NY: Guilford Press This book provided cases that demonstrate the psychotherapy of Rogers at work. This is especially valuable for portraying actual ways in which Rogers operate the directive approach using strategies such as frank humor, inflated reflection, persistent and purposeful probing, interpretative analysis, and metaphorical construal among others to familiarize client to innovative ideas as well as to break wasteful and futile silences. These are important to facilitate reflective thinking of the client in which therapist acts as active listener who merely acknowledges and respects whatever the client expresses during the counseling session by a simple responses like “um-hmm” or “uh-huh.” A therapist inadvertently controls the content of clients’ expressions through covert conditioning in which therapy is facilitated without one not even knowing it. This is an important book to learn how Roger’s client-centered approach works in action. Rogers, C. (2012). A Way of Being. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Rogers discuss the different significance and application of relationship in psychotherapy including his own experience, aspects of a person-centered approach on being emphatic, being lonely, creating person centered communities, the future educational process, and the future. It also discusses challenges to the person–centered approach as an encounter approach including understanding people from their perspective, socio ethical responses, creative ways of understanding , group therapy, and social therapy, among others. This book expanded the discussion of Rogers’ innovative approach on how one can personally use it for one’s own development. Cohen, D . (2000) Carl Rogers: A Critical Biography. London, UK: Constable & Robinson Limited This is essentially about the life of Carl Rogers researched and written by a British journalist. This included Rogers’ education, his shifts in career, his grief-stricken marriage, his alcoholism and other off the record information about his life extracted from papers, letters and documents left by him. Quite ironically, while Rogers may have devised a psychological way to attain a good life, he lived a life that is far from perfect or far from the idea of a good life that he projected. Rogers, C.R. (1970) Carl Rogers on Encounter Groups. New York: Harper and Row Publications This book discusses the client-centered therapy as applied or as it operates in groups which is called “basic encounter group”, which is fairly distinctive and provides a varying paradigm for group therapy as oppose to the idea that it merely involves a similar approach in working with groups because of diverse nature and its deficiency of distinctive characters to differentiate it from other process models. While the basic encounter group similarly entails a re-investigation of common aspects of group function such as group size, goal setting, ground rules and facilitator behavior, among others, it also focus on mutual growth of each members and the profound intimacy among members. Rogers, Carl R. Counseling and Psychotherapy: Newer Concepts in Practice. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1942 This book provides a detailed discussion of Rogers’ person-centered approach to counseling and psychotherapy and general idea of his view on the entire counseling process which included a comparison and contrast of the client-centered approach against other major approaches. It also enumerates the factors essential for successful counseling, and draws the fundamental stages of a comprehensive and successful encounter. The book also provided an extensive discussion of a transcript of one’s patient’s case highlighting on the reflective process involved in analyzing the emotional content of a client’s statements and motivational interviewing and ways to avoid imposing authoritative analysis. This book essentially contains Roger’s innovative approach and is recommended to anyone involved in psychology. Rogers, C. R. (1951) Client-Centered Therapy: Its Current Practice, Implications, and Theory. Boston: Houghton Mifflin As its title implies, this book presents the non-directive client centered therapeutic approach developed by Rogers that provides a clear account of the process by which people undergoing counsel can be assisted in effectively attaining personality adjustments. Divided into three parts, the first part discusses the present status of practice and theory including issues on transference, diagnosis, and applicability. The second part discusses play therapy, group-centered psychotherapy, group-centered leadership and administration, student-centered teaching and therapist training. The last part included of a discussion of Rogers’ Theory of Personality and Behavior. This book provides unfailing proof of the application and efficacy of the client-centered method. This book is a must for all students learning psychology. Rogers, C. (1978) Carl Rogers on Personal Power: Inner Strength and Its Revolutionary Impact. Trans-Atlantic Publications This book contains Rogers’ discussion on how one get in touch with oneself, attaining an open attitude no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem, allowing the freedom of choices, freeing oneself by eradicating obstructions to the constructive expression of feelings and constructive for personal growth or the fulfillment of their inherent possibilities. It also provides a critique to conventional education and adheres to person-centered education or student centered learning. This is an important book that can be used by anybody to learn self empowerment. Important** Each question is to have its own reference section. Question: John Watson made a major contribution to the world of psychology when he introduced behaviorism. Indicate one specific area in the practice of psychology where behaviorist treatment is valid. Support your opinion with some concrete, everyday observed examples and not just a summary of a theory. (2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources) Question: Freud ideas, identify two of his principles (defense mechanisms being one) or theories that you believe to be valid. Support your perspective with examples and properly source credit ideas and concepts; even if you think they have been around for so long that surely everyone has heard of them, they started in a publication somewhere and credit should be correctly attributed. (2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources) Question: Mind Reading by 60 minutes at http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5119805n. What ethical issues arise from this investigative practice? Include a discussion of the woman in India found guilty of a crime with little evidence except a brain scan. Could this method be used in the United States in the near future? Why or why not? Then, discuss the ways in which the understanding of biology/genetics has affected and continues to affect the development of ethical laws and moral standards within the field of contemporary psychology. What are some of the controversies surrounding this understanding? Provide specific examples. (2 full pages and 3 sources, 2 scholarly sources and the video) Questions: (250 words each and 2 references listed after each question) 1. Discuss the effect the Renaissance had on psychology. 2. Explain how Thorndike ruled out the idea that cats could learn to escape through reasoning and imitation. 3. How did Pavlov demonstrate the basic phenomena of conditioning, extinction, generalization, and differentiation? 4. Discuss the trends that psychology has in the new millennium. 5. Compare and contrast two different schools of psychology. An example would be Gestalt and Behaviorism. 6. Describe the traditional version of the Anna O. case, what really happened, and what Freud learned from the case (or thought he learned). 7. What are the similarities between john Locke’s empiricist ideas and John Watson’s behaviorist ideas? 8. Compare and contrast Radical behaviorism and Cognitive Science. 9. How did Skinners approach to science differ from Hull’s and Tolman’s? 10. Discuss Skinner’s two “mistakes” according to Staddon in addition to Staddon’s criticism of Skinner’s argument against the “autonomous man”. Important** Each question is to have its own reference section. Question: John Watson made a major contribution to the world of psychology when he introduced behaviorism. Indicate one specific area in the practice of psychology where behaviorist treatment is valid. Support your opinion with some concrete, everyday observed examples and not just a summary of a theory. (2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources) Question: Freud ideas, identify two of his principles (defense mechanisms being one) or theories that you believe to be valid. Support your perspective with examples and properly source credit ideas and concepts; even if you think they have been around for so long that surely everyone has heard of them, they started in a publication somewhere and credit should be correctly attributed. (2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources) Question: Mind Reading by 60 minutes at http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5119805n. What ethical issues arise from this investigative practice? Include a discussion of the woman in India found guilty of a crime with little evidence except a brain scan. Could this method be used in the United States in the near future? Why or why not? Then, discuss the ways in which the understanding of biology/genetics has affected and continues to affect the development of ethical laws and moral standards within the field of contemporary psychology. What are some of the controversies surrounding this understanding? Provide specific examples. (2 full pages and 3 sources, 2 scholarly sources and the video) Questions: (250 words each and 2 references listed after each question) 1. Discuss the effect the Renaissance had on psychology. 2. Explain how Thorndike ruled out the idea that cats could learn to escape through reasoning and imitation. 3. How did Pavlov demonstrate the basic phenomena of conditioning, extinction, generalization, and differentiation? 4. Discuss the trends that psychology has in the new millennium. 5. Compare and contrast two different schools of psychology. An example would be Gestalt and Behaviorism. 6. Describe the traditional version of the Anna O. case, what really happened, and what Freud learned from the case (or thought he learned). 7. What are the similarities between john Locke’s empiricist ideas and John Watson’s behaviorist ideas? 8. Compare and contrast Radical behaviorism and Cognitive Science. 9. How did Skinners approach to science differ from Hull’s and Tolman’s? 10. Discuss Skinner’s two “mistakes” according to Staddon in addition to Staddon’s criticism of Skinner’s argument against the “autonomous man”.

Instructions Part 2: 9 Pages, use the 8 sources from the annotated bibliography provided below. Also below is the thesis and feel of the work, use that feel and thesis.
This paper must reflect knowledge of course content and critical thinking. The main body of the work will begin with an introductory paragraph that articulates a succinct thesis statement and will conclude with a restatement of the thesis and summary conclusion paragraph, followed by a Reference page listing all sources used and the annotated bibliography developed earlier in the course.
Any images and tables used must be placed in an Appendix section following the Annotated Bibliography and are not considered part of the paper body content.
Below are required subheadings to be included in the main body of the paper.

Theorist Biography:A succinct biography of the theorist two to three pages in length and relevant to the purpose of the paper.

Contributions:A two to three page detailed explanation of the theorist’s most important contributions to the field and description of the theorist’s empirical research methodologies.

Evaluation:A two to three page critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations of your selected theorist’s theory.

Personal Response:A one to two page personal response to how you see the components of the theory you selected in operation in your everyday life. This should not be a discussion of your personal life, but a selection of concepts applied to your life as you see them through the eyes/concepts of the theorist. How does each concept apply to your life?

Carl Ransom Rogers and Annotated Bibliography
Thesis: Carl Rogers’ theory of the self is an effective approach to clinical psychological therapy
The founder of humanistic psychology, Carl Rogers was an American psychologist who developed a ground breaking theory of personality development, and created the person-centered or client-centered therapy in understanding personality, behavior, and human relations. He was born on January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois, Chicago. He started as Agriculture major then to religion in the University of Wisconsin before finally shifting to psychology at Columbia University. He cultivated his humanistic theory of personal development while dealing with abused children at the Rochester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
Roger’s Theory of Personality Development provides a broad array of explanations for behavior and the constitution of a person. It starts off with Maslow’s theory that all people possess the natural inclination to continue to grow and develop towards one’s self-actualization. At the core of this pursuit, is the concept of the ‘self’ which serves as the central component in developing and modifying human personality. The self refers to the sum of the multifaceted dynamic system of beliefs, attitudes and opinions that a person learns in time about one’s personal existence. It has three components namely: self-worth, self-image and ideal self. People aim to attain the ideal self, but more often than not, one’s real self diverges from the ideal self which is called incongruence. To achieve this, a person requires “unconditional positive regard from others” and “high self worth”. An “unconditional positive regard “ refers to the unqualified acceptance and love provided the people surrounding an individual, which provides a person strength and confidence try things out, commit mistakes, and bounce back from mistakes. A “high self worth” is characterized by confidence, faith in oneself, and positive feelings about oneself that one develops in life primarily through one’s interaction with parents. This allows one to have the strength to face challenges in life or accept failure and disappointments. A person with a high self-worth and who receives “unconditional positive regard” becomes a fully functioning person towards attaining optimal development or the good life.
Roger’s client-centered approach is another important contribution in the field of therapy and counseling. It is characterized by clients directing the progress of the therapy that is designed or built around the client, and it refrains from imposing an authoritative analysis in understanding and providing counseling to clients. This approach proactively engages patients to lead them to discover solutions of their problems by themselves, while the therapist only provides guidance. The therapist must have the qualities of congruence, empathy and unconditional positive regard to succeed. “Unconditional positive regard” of the therapist towards the client is attained through “reflection”, whereby the therapist persistently reaffirms what his client freely expresses in an attempt to demonstrate one’s complete acceptance of the client and facilitate self-realization and acknowledgement of any hidden or unconscious negative feelings that he or she may have. Therapy involves helping the client to better understand himself thereby allowing him to define his own problem and determine his own solution. Rogers’ client centered approaches have been commonly applied in counseling for marriage, parent child relationships and in education, e.g. learner-centered teaching. For his professional work and contribution in the field of psychology, Carl Rogers has been distinguished as an important and eminent authority in the field of psychology, whose humanistic theories and therapies continued to be practiced and followed today and for generations to come.

Annotated Bibliography
Rogers, C. (2012). On Becoming a Person: A Therapist’s View of Psychotherapy. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
The founder of the humanistic psychology, Carl Rogers revolutionized psychotherapy with his “client-centered therapy”, which has become a standard component in conventional psychology. The book included an introduction by Peter Kramer which place’s Roger’s work in modern context to elaborate on its continuing relevance and importance in today’s psychology in relation to modern psychopharmacological drugs that has recently blurred the psychotherapeutic relationship. He noted the modern trend that brings back the importance of the therapeutic encounter where Roger’s “client-centered therapy” is central. As one the pioneer therapists to delve into the therapeutic process, Roger provided investigates a therapist’s personal insights to the client form a psychodynamic standpoint of conveyance and vice versa. The rest of the book on the other hand, outlined Roger’s original Client-centered Therapy which among others tackles the prospects and obstacles to personal development, the nature of change, and the real meaning of therapeutic relations.
Farber, B. A., Brink, D.C. & Raskin, P.M. (Eds) (1996) The Psychotherapy of Carl Rogers: Cases and Commentary. New York, NY: Guilford Press
This book provided cases that demonstrate the psychotherapy of Rogers at work. This is especially valuable for portraying actual ways in which Rogers operate the directive approach using strategies such as frank humor, inflated reflection, persistent and purposeful probing, interpretative analysis, and metaphorical construal among others to familiarize client to innovative ideas as well as to break wasteful and futile silences. These are important to facilitate reflective thinking of the client in which therapist acts as active listener who merely acknowledges and respects whatever the client expresses during the counseling session by a simple responses like “um-hmm” or “uh-huh.” A therapist inadvertently controls the content of clients’ expressions through covert conditioning in which therapy is facilitated without one not even knowing it. This is an important book to learn how Roger’s client-centered approach works in action.
Rogers, C. (2012). A Way of Being. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Rogers discuss the different significance and application of relationship in psychotherapy including his own experience, aspects of a person-centered approach on being emphatic, being lonely, creating person centered communities, the future educational process, and the future. It also discusses challenges to the person–centered approach as an encounter approach including understanding people from their perspective, socio ethical responses, creative ways of understanding , group therapy, and social therapy, among others. This book expanded the discussion of Rogers’ innovative approach on how one can personally use it for one’s own development.
Cohen, D . (2000) Carl Rogers: A Critical Biography. London, UK: Constable & Robinson Limited
This is essentially about the life of Carl Rogers researched and written by a British journalist. This included Rogers’ education, his shifts in career, his grief-stricken marriage, his alcoholism and other off the record information about his life extracted from papers, letters and documents left by him. Quite ironically, while Rogers may have devised a psychological way to attain a good life, he lived a life that is far from perfect or far from the idea of a good life that he projected.

Rogers, C.R. (1970) Carl Rogers on Encounter Groups. New York: Harper and Row Publications
This book discusses the client-centered therapy as applied or as it operates in groups which is called “basic encounter group”, which is fairly distinctive and provides a varying paradigm for group therapy as oppose to the idea that it merely involves a similar approach in working with groups because of diverse nature and its deficiency of distinctive characters to differentiate it from other process models. While the basic encounter group similarly entails a re-investigation of common aspects of group function such as group size, goal setting, ground rules and facilitator behavior, among others, it also focus on mutual growth of each members and the profound intimacy among members.
Rogers, Carl R. Counseling and Psychotherapy: Newer Concepts in Practice. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1942
This book provides a detailed discussion of Rogers’ person-centered approach to counseling and psychotherapy and general idea of his view on the entire counseling process which included a comparison and contrast of the client-centered approach against other major approaches. It also enumerates the factors essential for successful counseling, and draws the fundamental stages of a comprehensive and successful encounter. The book also provided an extensive discussion of a transcript of one’s patient’s case highlighting on the reflective process involved in analyzing the emotional content of a client’s statements and motivational interviewing and ways to avoid imposing authoritative analysis. This book essentially contains Roger’s innovative approach and is recommended to anyone involved in psychology.
Rogers, C. R. (1951) Client-Centered Therapy: Its Current Practice, Implications, and Theory. Boston: Houghton Mifflin
As its title implies, this book presents the non-directive client centered therapeutic approach developed by Rogers that provides a clear account of the process by which people undergoing counsel can be assisted in effectively attaining personality adjustments. Divided into three parts, the first part discusses the present status of practice and theory including issues on transference, diagnosis, and applicability. The second part discusses play therapy, group-centered psychotherapy, group-centered leadership and administration, student-centered teaching and therapist training. The last part included of a discussion of Rogers’ Theory of Personality and Behavior. This book provides unfailing proof of the application and efficacy of the client-centered method. This book is a must for all students learning psychology.
Rogers, C. (1978) Carl Rogers on Personal Power: Inner Strength and Its Revolutionary Impact. Trans-Atlantic Publications
This book contains Rogers’ discussion on how one get in touch with oneself, attaining an open attitude no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem, allowing the freedom of choices, freeing oneself by eradicating obstructions to the constructive expression of feelings and constructive for personal growth or the fulfillment of their inherent possibilities. It also provides a critique to conventional education and adheres to person-centered education or student centered learning. This is an important book that can be used by anybody to learn self empowerment.

Important** Each question is to have its own reference section.
Question:
John Watson made a major contribution to the world of psychology when he introduced behaviorism. Indicate one specific area in the practice of psychology where behaviorist treatment is valid. Support your opinion with some concrete, everyday observed examples and not just a summary of a theory.
(2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources)

Question:
Freud ideas, identify two of his principles (defense mechanisms being one) or theories that you believe to be valid. Support your perspective with examples and properly source credit ideas and concepts; even if you think they have been around for so long that surely everyone has heard of them, they started in a publication somewhere and credit should be correctly attributed.
(2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources)

Question:
Mind Reading by 60 minutes at http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5119805n. What ethical issues arise from this investigative practice? Include a discussion of the woman in India found guilty of a crime with little evidence except a brain scan. Could this method be used in the United States in the near future? Why or why not? Then, discuss the ways in which the understanding of biology/genetics has affected and continues to affect the development of ethical laws and moral standards within the field of contemporary psychology. What are some of the controversies surrounding this understanding? Provide specific examples.
(2 full pages and 3 sources, 2 scholarly sources and the video)

Questions: (250 words each and 2 references listed after each question)
1. Discuss the effect the Renaissance had on psychology.
2. Explain how Thorndike ruled out the idea that cats could learn to escape through reasoning and imitation.
3. How did Pavlov demonstrate the basic phenomena of conditioning, extinction, generalization, and differentiation?
4. Discuss the trends that psychology has in the new millennium.
5. Compare and contrast two different schools of psychology. An example would be Gestalt and Behaviorism.
6. Describe the traditional version of the Anna O. case, what really happened, and what Freud learned from the case (or thought he learned).
7. What are the similarities between john Locke’s empiricist ideas and John Watson’s behaviorist ideas?
8. Compare and contrast Radical behaviorism and Cognitive Science.
9. How did Skinners approach to science differ from Hull’s and Tolman’s?
10. Discuss Skinner’s two “mistakes” according to Staddon in addition to Staddon’s criticism of Skinner’s argument against the “autonomous man”.

Important** Each question is to have its own reference section.
Question:
John Watson made a major contribution to the world of psychology when he introduced behaviorism. Indicate one specific area in the practice of psychology where behaviorist treatment is valid. Support your opinion with some concrete, everyday observed examples and not just a summary of a theory.
(2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources)

Question:
Freud ideas, identify two of his principles (defense mechanisms being one) or theories that you believe to be valid. Support your perspective with examples and properly source credit ideas and concepts; even if you think they have been around for so long that surely everyone has heard of them, they started in a publication somewhere and credit should be correctly attributed.
(2 full pages and 2 scholarly sources)

Question:
Mind Reading by 60 minutes at http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5119805n. What ethical issues arise from this investigative practice? Include a discussion of the woman in India found guilty of a crime with little evidence except a brain scan. Could this method be used in the United States in the near future? Why or why not? Then, discuss the ways in which the understanding of biology/genetics has affected and continues to affect the development of ethical laws and moral standards within the field of contemporary psychology. What are some of the controversies surrounding this understanding? Provide specific examples.
(2 full pages and 3 sources, 2 scholarly sources and the video)

Questions: (250 words each and 2 references listed after each question)
1. Discuss the effect the Renaissance had on psychology.
2. Explain how Thorndike ruled out the idea that cats could learn to escape through reasoning and imitation.
3. How did Pavlov demonstrate the basic phenomena of conditioning, extinction, generalization, and differentiation?
4. Discuss the trends that psychology has in the new millennium.
5. Compare and contrast two different schools of psychology. An example would be Gestalt and Behaviorism.
6. Describe the traditional version of the Anna O. case, what really happened, and what Freud learned from the case (or thought he learned).
7. What are the similarities between john Locke’s empiricist ideas and John Watson’s behaviorist ideas?
8. Compare and contrast Radical behaviorism and Cognitive Science.
9. How did Skinners approach to science differ from Hull’s and Tolman’s?
10. Discuss Skinner’s two “mistakes” according to Staddon in addition to Staddon’s criticism of Skinner’s argument against the “autonomous man”.

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