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Civil right CLICK HERE TO ORDER FOR THIS PAPER…………………….

Civil Rights are a major part of history; particularly for minorities and women.  It when blacks and other minorities started independence and equal rights. Since blacks, more than any other minority groups in America have had the toughest past known as struggle for equal rights. This is due to the fact that most of the majority believed that when the people in the minority group are of another color, they are also different in other ways, and therefore, not entitled to quite the same rights and privileges. This belief was not limited to just the South. Discrimination has always been pervasive throughout all of Western civilization. 
            It wasn’t more than 150 years ago that Black was considered inferior and where held as slaves. African Americans have fought hard against the overwhelming racist powers to earn the rights that they have now but racism still goes on in some part of the world still. Racism has been a hard fought war.  It was fight after fight for African Americans to earn their equal and freedom rights. After earning freedom from slavery, Blacks fought for more than one hundred years to be considered equals in society. That struggle reached its climax during the 1960s, when the biggest gains in the area of civil rights were made.  Blacks and whites remained separate and blacks were still treated as slave. Everything from buses to bathroom to water fountains to city parks was segregated. Signs that read, “Whites only no coloreds” were all in these place on the doors of stores and restaurants throughout the southern states. Blacks and whites went to different schools where black children would have classes in dirty classrooms with poor, second hand supplies. These are just a few examples of some of the much racial discrimination which blacks once had to face in America in the early 60s.Black knew change will come but didn’t know when. The urbanization of the South, the impact of television and radio, the desegregated armed forces, and other factors began to blur the distinctions between geographic regions. These all set a stage for revolution for blacks in America.
            Blacks made more gains during the 1960s than they did in all the decades combined since the Civil War. In the early 1950s which was the day the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in schools was unconstitutional and wasn’t accepted. This triggered an awakening amongst Blacks that they could protest against injustice and achieve results. The legislation passed in the 1960’s included the overturn of the hated Plessey v. Ferguson case, and laws outlining the complete integration of blacks with the rest of society with laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
            The reason the battle for civil rights picked up so much support was because the 1960s saw America’s strongest period of liberalism. This strong liberalism greatly helped the African American cause. However, the biggest factor in this great social change was the influence of black civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. In the atmosphere of the 1960s these men were very effective fighting for black civil rights. The 1960s were a very productive decade in the advancement black civil rights.
             The Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, the Supreme Court declared that separate educational facilities were inherently unequal. This ruling was the spark that ignited the civil rights movement to follow. The next year Rosa Parks, a member of the Montgomery, Alabama, branch NAACP was told to give up her seat on a city bus to a white person. She wouldn’t budge and was promptly arrested for refusing to move. The NAACP, led by Edgar D. Nixon, realized that the arrest of Parks might rally local blacks to protest segregated buses. Montgomery’s black community had always been upset about the rude treatment they received on the buses. The community had previously considered a boycott of the buses, and the incident with Parks was enough to get one started. The next day one was organized. The Montgomery bus boycott was an immediate success, with virtually unanimous support from the 50,000 blacks in Montgomery. It lasted for more than a year and dramatized to the American public the determination of blacks in the South to end segregation. A federal court ordered Montgomery’s buses desegregated in November 1956, and the boycott ended in triumph. This was the first truly successful protest by blacks. African Americans across America saw the power which they possessed and were inspired by the incident. 
      



Civil right

CLICK HERE TO ORDER FOR THIS PAPER…………………….

Civil Rights are a major part of history; particularly for minorities and women.  It when blacks and other minorities started independence and equal rights. Since blacks, more than any other minority groups in America have had the toughest past known as struggle for equal rights. This is due to the fact that most of the majority believed that when the people in the minority group are of another color, they are also different in other ways, and therefore, not entitled to quite the same rights and privileges. This belief was not limited to just the South. Discrimination has always been pervasive throughout all of Western civilization. 
            It wasn’t more than 150 years ago that Black was considered inferior and where held as slaves. African Americans have fought hard against the overwhelming racist powers to earn the rights that they have now but racism still goes on in some part of the world still. Racism has been a hard fought war.  It was fight after fight for African Americans to earn their equal and freedom rights. After earning freedom from slavery, Blacks fought for more than one hundred years to be considered equals in society. That struggle reached its climax during the 1960s, when the biggest gains in the area of civil rights were made.  Blacks and whites remained separate and blacks were still treated as slave. Everything from buses to bathroom to water fountains to city parks was segregated. Signs that read, “Whites only no coloreds” were all in these place on the doors of stores and restaurants throughout the southern states. Blacks and whites went to different schools where black children would have classes in dirty classrooms with poor, second hand supplies. These are just a few examples of some of the much racial discrimination which blacks once had to face in America in the early 60s.Black knew change will come but didn’t know when. The urbanization of the South, the impact of television and radio, the desegregated armed forces, and other factors began to blur the distinctions between geographic regions. These all set a stage for revolution for blacks in America.

            Blacks made more gains during the 1960s than they did in all the decades combined since the Civil War. In the early 1950s which was the day the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in schools was unconstitutional and wasn’t accepted. This triggered an awakening amongst Blacks that they could protest against injustice and achieve results. The legislation passed in the 1960’s included the overturn of the hated Plessey v. Ferguson case, and laws outlining the complete integration of blacks with the rest of society with laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

            The reason the battle for civil rights picked up so much support was because the 1960s saw America’s strongest period of liberalism. This strong liberalism greatly helped the African American cause. However, the biggest factor in this great social change was the influence of black civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. In the atmosphere of the 1960s these men were very effective fighting for black civil rights. The 1960s were a very productive decade in the advancement black civil rights.
             The Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, the Supreme Court declared that separate educational facilities were inherently unequal. This ruling was the spark that ignited the civil rights movement to follow. The next year Rosa Parks, a member of the Montgomery, Alabama, branch NAACP was told to give up her seat on a city bus to a white person. She wouldn’t budge and was promptly arrested for refusing to move. The NAACP, led by Edgar D. Nixon, realized that the arrest of Parks might rally local blacks to protest segregated buses. Montgomery’s black community had always been upset about the rude treatment they received on the buses. The community had previously considered a boycott of the buses, and the incident with Parks was enough to get one started. The next day one was organized. The Montgomery bus boycott was an immediate success, with virtually unanimous support from the 50,000 blacks in Montgomery. It lasted for more than a year and dramatized to the American public the determination of blacks in the South to end segregation. A federal court ordered Montgomery’s buses desegregated in November 1956, and the boycott ended in triumph. This was the first truly successful protest by blacks. African Americans across America saw the power which they possessed and were inspired by the incident. 

      


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