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Author Guidelines for individual GH end of year paper – IBMG GH year2 Your file: • Obligatory title: family name_paperGH3 • European or US version of Word file, no pdf, odt or txt Structure: The text will generally proceed through sections of: • Title Page, including name of author, student number, year of study, country of study • Table of contents, including page numbering • List of abbreviations • Abstract (150 words) – to be used for your end of year symposium • Introduction (to country + research question) • Methods (how did you find your data) • Results (summary of the data found) • Discussion (interpretation, limitations, implications) • Conclusion (answers the research question) • Bibliography (literature cited, including proper web references and sources of maps) • Search profile in case of difficulties in finding data • Annexes Size and format: • Front page: see format. The full title of the paper should be concise. • Length: 3000 words (± 300 words) A4 core text, excluding Title Page, Table of Contents, List of abbreviations, Bibliography and Annexes. (This total guideline contains 1600 words.) • Letter type Arial, size 10, spacing 1.5 lines, margins 2,54 cm top and bottom, left and right, page numbers at the bottom of the text . – like this text. • Each section/ chapter starts on a new page. • Units should always be expressed with the solidus, e.g. g/l, not g l -1. • All numbers should be written as digits. • Foreign words like local words or Latin names of micro-organisms should be written in italics. Reference format: • Vancouver, Arabic numerals in parentheses (1) in the text. • Tables: Number all tables in the order of their citation in the text. (1,2,3,) Include a title for each table which explains the content of the table • Figures: Number all figures (graphs, charts, photographs, and illustrations) in the order of their citation in the text. Include a title for each figure (which explains the content of the figure Literature/ text/ report review: Check the relevance and quality of the literature or sources you use. Distinguish primary and secondary sources, as well as academic and grey literature; understand how the authors have reached their findings to be able to judge the quality. Question yourself: Which studies had contradictory findings? Do they help you to understand different points of view or are some findings incorrect? Use arguments. Style: In the main text a neutral scientific style should be used. In the Results and Conclusions you have to refer to information already given. Do not add anything new in these parts. You can give additional information in the Discussion (including your own opinion). “Don’t” use informal language. Phrase bank: The phrases, and the headings under which they are listed, can be used to assist you in thinking about the content and organisation of your own work See http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/ Plagiarism The idea of research is to study what others have published and form your own opinion. When you quote people, or even when you summarise or paraphrase information found in books, articles, or web pages, you must acknowledge the original author. All work is scanned (Ephorus programme in NESTOR). The teacher judges objectively whether the similarities are seen as plagiarism, In case of doubt advice of the Examination board is asked for. Bibliography: Be sure to keep your bibliographic information in track. It is a lot of work if you have to seek for the references later. (Tip: use a web based application for managing references, for example Refworks: http://www.rug.nl/science-and-society/library/support/refworks/) Lack of information For some countries data are difficult to obtain. Try to find them in relevant journals or other websites besides those of the UN/WHO. In case you feel to have too little or too unreliable information, describe shortly where you looked and did not succeed. Alternatively you could try to deduce/ speculate on data if you have access to information from neighbouring countries. Here your arguments are very important. If you can proof us the data are not available you will NOT fail due to lack of data. Therefore add a description of your search profile, see below, to show how you have tried to find information. Search strategy for PubMed or any other search engine: 1. Clear presentation (“strings” or in a table)/ be explicit about the MeSH and free text words used, Booleans and limitations 2. Give the number of articles retrieved 3. Save the PubMed search and copy it in the text.

Author Guidelines for individual GH end of year paper – IBMG GH year2

Your file:
• Obligatory title: family name_paperGH3
• European or US version of Word file, no pdf, odt or txt

Structure:
The text will generally proceed through sections of:
• Title Page, including name of author, student number, year of study, country of study
• Table of contents, including page numbering
• List of abbreviations
• Abstract (150 words) – to be used for your end of year symposium
• Introduction (to country + research question)
• Methods (how did you find your data)
• Results (summary of the data found)
• Discussion (interpretation, limitations, implications)
• Conclusion (answers the research question)
• Bibliography (literature cited, including proper web references and sources of maps)
• Search profile in case of difficulties in finding data
• Annexes

Size and format:
• Front page: see format. The full title of the paper should be concise.
• Length: 3000 words (± 300 words) A4 core text, excluding Title Page, Table of Contents, List of abbreviations, Bibliography and Annexes. (This total guideline contains 1600 words.)
• Letter type Arial, size 10, spacing 1.5 lines, margins 2,54 cm top and bottom, left and right, page numbers at the bottom of the text . – like this text.
• Each section/ chapter starts on a new page.
• Units should always be expressed with the solidus, e.g. g/l, not g l -1.
• All numbers should be written as digits.
• Foreign words like local words or Latin names of micro-organisms should be written in italics.

Reference format:
• Vancouver, Arabic numerals in parentheses (1) in the text.
• Tables: Number all tables in the order of their citation in the text. (1,2,3,) Include a title for each table which explains the content of the table
• Figures: Number all figures (graphs, charts, photographs, and illustrations) in the order of their citation in the text. Include a title for each figure (which explains the content of the figure

Literature/ text/ report review:
Check the relevance and quality of the literature or sources you use. Distinguish primary and secondary sources, as well as academic and grey literature; understand how the authors have reached their findings to be able to judge the quality.
Question yourself: Which studies had contradictory findings? Do they help you to understand different points of view or are some findings incorrect? Use arguments.

Style:
In the main text a neutral scientific style should be used. In the Results and Conclusions you have to refer to information already given. Do not add anything new in these parts. You can give additional information in the Discussion (including your own opinion). “Don’t” use informal language.
Phrase bank: The phrases, and the headings under which they are listed, can be used to assist you in thinking about the content and organisation of your own work See http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/
Plagiarism
The idea of research is to study what others have published and form your own opinion. When you quote people, or even when you summarise or paraphrase information found in books, articles, or web pages, you must acknowledge the original author.
All work is scanned (Ephorus programme in NESTOR). The teacher judges objectively whether the similarities are seen as plagiarism, In case of doubt advice of the Examination board is asked for.
Bibliography:
Be sure to keep your bibliographic information in track. It is a lot of work if you have to seek for the references later. (Tip: use a web based application for managing references, for example Refworks: http://www.rug.nl/science-and-society/library/support/refworks/)
Lack of information
For some countries data are difficult to obtain. Try to find them in relevant journals or other websites besides those of the UN/WHO. In case you feel to have too little or too unreliable information, describe shortly where you looked and did not succeed. Alternatively you could try to deduce/ speculate on data if you have access to information from neighbouring countries. Here your arguments are very important. If you can proof us the data are not available you will NOT fail due to lack of data. Therefore add a description of your search profile, see below, to show how you have tried to find information.
Search strategy for PubMed or any other search engine:
1. Clear presentation (“strings” or in a table)/ be explicit about the MeSH and free text words used, Booleans and limitations
2. Give the number of articles retrieved
3. Save the PubMed search and copy it in the text.

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