Click here to have a similar A+ quality paper

Order Now

ASSIGNMENT TOP SHEET Faculty of Creative Arts, Technologies & Science Department of Computing & Information Systems Student Ref. No Unit Code: CIS011-1 Unit Name Introduction to Logical Reasoning Deadline for Submission(s) 6th April 2014, 18:00hrs Student’s Surname Student’s Forename Unit Leader’s Name: Tess Crosbie Assignment Details: Assignment 2 CIS011-1 Introduction to Logical Reasoning Assignment 2 Students are asked to answer all questions below. The marking scheme is supplied. Total = 100 marks Question 1 How could you describe the internet to someone who has not seen it? Write an explanation of between 500 and 750 words, using a suitable model to illustrate its features. 20 marks Question 2 “Life can never mean life, even for the most dangerous killers, European judges have ruled. Locking them up, without any prospect of freedom, is a breach of their human rights. It would be up to parole boards to decide whether they still pose a threat to the public, after serving long terms. Whole-lifers should be entitled to a review of their sentence 25 years into their term at the very latest, the Grand Chamber of the Strasbourg-based court said. The European court found that for a life sentence to remain compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights there had to be both a possibility of release and a possibility of review. In their ruling, the judges said it was up to the national authorities to decide when such a review should take place, however, existing legal comparisons gave support to guaranteeing a review no later than 25 years after the imposition of a life sentence. Up until 2003, there was a right to review for all whole-life orders in the UK but this was removed in a change of legislation. It’s very important that the court have recognised that no sentence should be once and for all and there should always be some right to look at some sentences again. They have not said that anyone must be released, what they have said is that it must be reviewed.” http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/life-can-t-mean-life-european-judges-say-1-2995309 Identify the premises and conclusions of this complex argument. You may use any diagramming method to indicate them, if you wish. 15 marks Question 3 Construct a truth table for the following formula: (P ^ Q) -> (R v S) 15 marks Question 4 Identify the fallacies in the following statements a) You are either with us or you are with the terrorists – President George Bush b) Mr Adrian, did you not enter the apartment of Brian on the night of August 18th? c) Dennett states that only someone with “professional knowledge” of the books’ primary topic, geography, should review them. Yet Dennett himself, a professor of philosophy, has written widely on subjects about which he is not a specialist. – Greg Easterbrook, New York Times, 2005 12 marks Question 5 On what grounds can the following definitions be criticised? a) Triangle: a geometrical figure with equal sides and equal angles b) Triangle: a closed three-sided plane figure with equal angles c) A neonatologist is someone who specialises in caring for neonates 6 marks   Question 6 What category best describes the following definitions? a) “Phishing” means attempting to acquire a computer password or other private information by using an online deceptive practice b) Before the 1940s, a “computer” was a person hired to do lengthy computations, such as the development of tables for determining the trajectories of cannon shells 6 marks Question 7 What type of ambiguity exists in the following statements? How could you re-phrase each statement to make it unambiguous? a) Business managers who succeed have a good understanding of psychology b) Conference on Reasoning at Bedfordshire University c) A student must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish to register for a seminar in literature. 6 marks Question 8 Your computer will not power up. Explain how using Mills’ Method could help to determine what is wrong. 20 marks

ASSIGNMENT TOP SHEET
Faculty of Creative Arts, Technologies & Science
Department of Computing & Information Systems

Student Ref. No Unit Code: CIS011-1

Unit Name
Introduction to Logical Reasoning Deadline for Submission(s)
6th April 2014, 18:00hrs

Student’s Surname
Student’s Forename

Unit Leader’s Name: Tess Crosbie

Assignment Details: Assignment 2

CIS011-1 Introduction to Logical Reasoning

Assignment 2

Students are asked to answer all questions below. The marking scheme is supplied.
Total = 100 marks

Question 1
How could you describe the internet to someone who has not seen it? Write an explanation of between 500 and 750 words, using a suitable model to illustrate its features.
20 marks
Question 2

“Life can never mean life, even for the most dangerous killers, European judges have ruled. Locking them up, without any prospect of freedom, is a breach of their human rights. It would be up to parole boards to decide whether they still pose a threat to the public, after serving long terms. Whole-lifers should be entitled to a review of their sentence 25 years into their term at the very latest, the Grand Chamber of the Strasbourg-based court said.

The European court found that for a life sentence to remain compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights there had to be both a possibility of release and a possibility of review. In their ruling, the judges said it was up to the national authorities to decide when such a review should take place, however, existing legal comparisons gave support to guaranteeing a review no later than 25 years after the imposition of a life sentence.

Up until 2003, there was a right to review for all whole-life orders in the UK but this was removed in a change of legislation.

It’s very important that the court have recognised that no sentence should be once and for all and there should always be some right to look at some sentences again. They have not said that anyone must be released, what they have said is that it must be reviewed.”
http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/life-can-t-mean-life-european-judges-say-1-2995309

Identify the premises and conclusions of this complex argument. You may use any diagramming method to indicate them, if you wish.
15 marks
Question 3
Construct a truth table for the following formula: (P ^ Q) -> (R v S)
15 marks
Question 4
Identify the fallacies in the following statements
a) You are either with us or you are with the terrorists – President George Bush
b) Mr Adrian, did you not enter the apartment of Brian on the night of August 18th?
c) Dennett states that only someone with “professional knowledge” of the books’ primary topic, geography, should review them. Yet Dennett himself, a professor of philosophy, has written widely on subjects about which he is not a specialist. – Greg Easterbrook, New York Times, 2005
12 marks

Question 5
On what grounds can the following definitions be criticised?
a) Triangle: a geometrical figure with equal sides and equal angles
b) Triangle: a closed three-sided plane figure with equal angles
c) A neonatologist is someone who specialises in caring for neonates
6 marks

Question 6
What category best describes the following definitions?
a) “Phishing” means attempting to acquire a computer password or other private information by using an online deceptive practice
b) Before the 1940s, a “computer” was a person hired to do lengthy computations, such as the development of tables for determining the trajectories of cannon shells
6 marks

Question 7
What type of ambiguity exists in the following statements? How could you re-phrase each statement to make it unambiguous?
a) Business managers who succeed have a good understanding of psychology
b) Conference on Reasoning at Bedfordshire University
c) A student must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish to register for a seminar in literature.
6 marks

Question 8
Your computer will not power up. Explain how using Mills’ Method could help to determine what is wrong.
20 marks

Click here to have a similar A+ quality paper

Order Now