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Assignment 2: Family Case Study Recursive Writing Please view the marking rubric in the assignment section There are strict rules about the family you are able to observe and how the field notes and reflections are recorded as you observe the family. These conditions MUST be met in order to pass. Word length: 1500 words for recursive writing (extra words in total for case notes, interview questions, practical component, questionnaire, permission slips etc) Some of these extra words may be collaborative documents e.g. questionnaire. The words in the case notes, reflections, interview questions etc will appear in the appendices of the assignment and therefore not count towards the assignment word count, but they are marked. Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 You will have the opportunity to spend time with a family in which at least one child is 0-3 years old and attends an early childhood service (e.g. playgroup, daycare, early intervention, creche, childcare). The Family Case Study experience, the accompanying field and interview notes, and recursive, reflective journal will detail your observations and discussions with a family over a five week period. IT IS EXPECTED THAT YOU WILL HAVE READ and VIEWED THE RESOURCES IN THE LEARNING MODULES, particularly 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8. To complete this assignment you should: 1. Locate a family that you can visit once a week (for 5 weeks), that has a child or children attending an early childhood service OTHER THAN YOUR OWN. The service can be any early childhood setting with staff that have some tertiary qualifications to work with children in the birth to eight years age group. There should be at least one child in the 0-3 years age-group although siblings will also be observed as they are part of the family. Weekly contact should be maintained for at least five weeks. Explain to the parent/s or caregivers that the assignment is part of a family studies unit and will require 5 visits. It is important that you visit the family at their home – it does NOT involve a visit to the early childhood service that the family uses. You can also accompany the family on outings e.g. the park. Note: It is important to locate a family outside your own family or close friendship network as it may be difficult to be an unobtrusive observer if you have strong links with the family. The early childhood service that the child or children in the family attends may be one you know of, but once again, should not be one in which you are currently employed. Think about asking friends of friends, friends of colleagues and friends of relatives. This type of case study research requires detailed observations of a family in their home setting. The opportunity to observe the family over a five week period will enable the family to share their experiences with you in a more complete manner. The observations of one case study cannot be generalised to other families but there may be issues raised from this work that build on your current knowledge and experience of the topic and your own professional practices with families. If the family is from your service, it is an unprofessional situation as they may discuss your friends and colleagues which puts you in a compromised position. You will need to obtain formal consent from the family to participate in the case study. A permission form and an information sheet will need to be developed and tailored to your family. You can work on this in your small study groups and share this resource if you wish. There is a template in the assignment section which you will need to tailor to your own family. 2. Read and Re-read: Particular guidance for this assignment can be found in the Bartlett et al. (1997) reading available in the Learning Modules. The article details the experiences of staff and students involved in a family studies unit, in the Bachelor of Education degree (Early Childhood), Queensland University of Technology. The students were required to conduct a similar case study to the one you will be conducting and this is explained in the article. The authors identify issues which were important for the families along with recommendations for ECEC professionals. 3. Visit the family at home for visits of about 1 hour and assume the role of uninvolved student observer to enable you to understand family activities and interactions at home. It is important to note that you are a student observing a family. You are not there to find and solve their ‘problems’ or make judgements. If possible, visit at least once when all family members are at home. You can vary the time of day that the visits occur to see different routines and happenings. You need to at all times work around the family, and if needed, visit when they are available (which may be more than once a week, and then not for two weeks). It is normal to feel some discomfort or nervousness at visiting a family and observing them when you don’t know them. This will quickly pass as you get to know them during this time. 4. Make field notes after each visit (kept this up to date at all times). It is important to record your notes as soon as you have left the family in order to catch the detail of the activities of each family member. In your blog put the heading: ‘Visit 1, Date, Time, Field Notes’. For your first visit, include a context for the reader e.g. The family lives in an inner city two bedroom flat, 10 minutes from the capital city. Record how they interact together, what types of routines and play activities are included and how children are involved. It is better not to take too many notes during the visits, just observe and keep first visits short so that you can leave the home and record things that happen and any conversations you had. Try to maintain the role of observer rather than participating too much with the children. Do not use cameras, video recorders or tape recorders. This type of data gathering requires different preparation and analysis which is not included in this unit of study. 4b) After each visit read over your field notes (i.e. what actually happened). Take some time to then reflect on what you think you saw and how that relates to some of the course materials. (There is more information on that below). Using the heading ‘Reflection from visit 1′ etc. you will then post in the blog your thoughts, questions, wonderings, assumptions, changes in perceptions etc. You are likely to observe both positive and negative issues impacting the family. 5. For a later visit, prepare some questions and talk with the parents in a semi-formal interview about the key issues for the family and discuss this in an open, non-judgemental manner. You will need to take notes during this session. Many of these questions can be formulated in your small study group. You can add your own specific questions that relate to your family to this list. 6. Conduct a closing session with the family and give them or send a follow up thank you letter and possibly an appropriate, reusable, healthy gift that the whole family will use (e.g. seeds for the garden, potplant, kitchen sprouts or herb growing kit) A special note: Confidentiality At all times the privacy of the family and centre the children attend must be protected. In order to protect the identity of participants, and to ensure them of your confidentiality, you must not discuss the details using the participants’ real names. In the journal writing it is best to use substitute names for the parents and the children rather than the first letter of their name or a number. This enhances the presentation of your work. You need to make a statement at the start of the journal and your final submission explaining that you have done this. The assessable components of the Family Case Study are outlined below. To complete this Assessment Task you should: 1. Keep a journal in This personal, reflective journal will detail pertinent experiences with the family (using pseudonyms), and other relationships you have observed and experienced during the case study – your observations, the conversations, your thoughts, your feelings, surprises, challenges, wonderings, assumptions, etc. An important feature of the assessment for this unit requires that you demonstrate abilities for developing appropriate relationships with families. One effective mechanism for you to demonstrate these abilities is in the form of a detailed personal, reflective journal. You will need to follow the guidelines suggested on page 142 (of the article) entitled ‘Parent/Staff Relationships’ (a’Beckett, 1988). The section entitled ‘Examination of Personal Attitudes’ provides a guide. 2. When you have completed your visits with the family, revisit your journal writing. Recursive journaling is a technique by which you reread your journal entries and look for any patterns, themes, contradictions, etc. which then become topics to explore further by drawing upon the literature in the Unit and perhaps doing further personal writing as you explore these topics. How do the developing themes relate to the theories of families? How do the developing themes fit in with what you learnt in the modules that they relate to (not all modules)? 3. Publish a final assessable piece of recursive writing (essay or another style with an introduction, headings/subheadings, conclusion and reference list) To achieve a pass in this assignment your recursive writing will need to demonstrate that you can identify and analyse the key issues influencing the family you are studying. The recursive writing can be written in ‘first person’ (e.g. I found that ….) and will demonstrate confirmed or new perspectives and ideas that you have on the topic. The recursive writing needs to demonstrate that you are both proactive and sensitive in your understanding of the diversity of families in Australia today. Your identification and explanation of the family type that your family represents will provide an opportunity for you to demonstrate your sensitive understanding of family diversity. You will highlight key points from observations of the family and discuss the links between the selected family and their friends and extended family. you will choose around 3-4 to issues discuss in more depth. Include information about any changes in your appreciation of the issues that families face and changes that have refined your interactions with parents. Explain how these interactions are more appropriate. Also include a comparison between your experiences during the case study and the material detailed in the article by Bartlett et al. (1997) in eReserve. This should be about 2 paragraphs (minimum). You will need to use a minimum of eight references from the readings from the Learning Modules, as well as ADDITIONAL literature you find helpful and appropriate. Consider some of the small research tasks you have conducted in your small study groups and in your reflection blog. FORMAT: The format of the document is up to you. (It does not have to be a word document.) ** Ensure you include a title page for your Assignment with a word count and adhere to APA referencing. Summary of submissions: 1. Private journal – 4 – 5 reflections (journal) about each of your visits – no word count toward the recursive writing. You may also use this space to record the interview and other information. We will be checking you have done this on Moodle, but you will need to submit a copy of it in your appendix as outlined below. There should be two parts: field notes about what actually happened for each visit that is recorded soon after the visit, then another entry for each visit that is a reflection about what you observed and have thought about since the visit. This space does not need to contain formal academic writing. These are your notes and I will be reading them in order to see that you have done the practical part of the assignment and to see how you have identified the main themes in your reflective writing. 1500-1700 words recursive writing (essay or another style) PLUS appendices. The appendices will include: • private blog entries cut and pasted (including field notes, reflections, family background, • interview questions and answers typed together for easy reading, • unsigned copy of the consent letter and form, • reflections from the 8 modules which show your learnings from the unit (these do not need to be polished pieces of writing, just evidence that you have interacted with the modules in brief dot point form) • thank you letter, etc N.B. Appendices do not have a word count in academic writing and are not included in the word count of 1500 for the essay. The marking rubric is in the assignment section and will help you make sure you are covering all of the areas above. It will also show you how marks are awarded.

Assignment 2: Family Case Study Recursive Writing

Please view the marking rubric in the assignment section There are strict rules about the family you are able to observe and how the field notes and reflections are recorded as you observe the family. These conditions MUST be met in order to pass.
Word length: 1500 words for recursive writing (extra words in total for case notes, interview questions, practical component, questionnaire, permission slips etc) Some of these extra words may be collaborative documents e.g. questionnaire. The words in the case notes, reflections, interview questions etc will appear in the appendices of the assignment and therefore not count towards the assignment word count, but they are marked.
Relevant Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
You will have the opportunity to spend time with a family in which at least one child is 0-3 years old and attends an early childhood service (e.g. playgroup, daycare, early intervention, creche, childcare). The Family Case Study experience, the accompanying field and interview notes, and recursive, reflective journal will detail your observations and discussions with a family over a five week period.
IT IS EXPECTED THAT YOU WILL HAVE READ and VIEWED THE RESOURCES IN THE LEARNING MODULES, particularly 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8.

To complete this assignment you should:
1. Locate a family that you can visit once a week (for 5 weeks), that has a child or children attending an early childhood service OTHER THAN YOUR OWN. The service can be any early childhood setting with staff that have some tertiary qualifications to work with children in the birth to eight years age group. There should be at least one child in the 0-3 years age-group although siblings will also be observed as they are part of the family. Weekly contact should be maintained for at least five weeks. Explain to the parent/s or caregivers that the assignment is part of a family studies unit and will require 5 visits. It is important that you visit the family at their home – it does NOT involve a visit to the early childhood service that the family uses. You can also accompany the family on outings e.g. the park.
Note: It is important to locate a family outside your own family or close friendship network as it may be difficult to be an unobtrusive observer if you have strong links with the family. The early childhood service that the child or children in the family attends may be one you know of, but once again, should not be one in which you are currently employed. Think about asking friends of friends, friends of colleagues and friends of relatives.
This type of case study research requires detailed observations of a family in their home setting. The opportunity to observe the family over a five week period will enable the family to share their experiences with you in a more complete manner. The observations of one case study cannot be generalised to other families but there may be issues raised from this work that build on your current knowledge and experience of the topic and your own professional practices with families. If the family is from your service, it is an unprofessional situation as they may discuss your friends and colleagues which puts you in a compromised position.
You will need to obtain formal consent from the family to participate in the case study. A permission form and an information sheet will need to be developed and tailored to your family. You can work on this in your small study groups and share this resource if you wish. There is a template in the assignment section which you will need to tailor to your own family.
2. Read and Re-read: Particular guidance for this assignment can be found in the Bartlett et al. (1997) reading available in the Learning Modules. The article details the experiences of staff and students involved in a family studies unit, in the Bachelor of Education degree (Early Childhood), Queensland University of Technology. The students were required to conduct a similar case study to the one you will be conducting and this is explained in the article. The authors identify issues which were important for the families along with recommendations for ECEC professionals.
3. Visit the family at home for visits of about 1 hour and assume the role of uninvolved student observer to enable you to understand family activities and interactions at home. It is important to note that you are a student observing a family. You are not there to find and solve their ‘problems’ or make judgements. If possible, visit at least once when all family members are at home. You can vary the time of day that the visits occur to see different routines and happenings. You need to at all times work around the family, and if needed, visit when they are available (which may be more than once a week, and then not for two weeks). It is normal to feel some discomfort or nervousness at visiting a family and observing them when you don’t know them. This will quickly pass as you get to know them during this time.
4. Make field notes after each visit (kept this up to date at all times). It is important to record your notes as soon as you have left the family in order to catch the detail of the activities of each family member. In your blog put the heading: ‘Visit 1, Date, Time, Field Notes’. For your first visit, include a context for the reader e.g. The family lives in an inner city two bedroom flat, 10 minutes from the capital city. Record how they interact together, what types of routines and play activities are included and how children are involved. It is better not to take too many notes during the visits, just observe and keep first visits short so that you can leave the home and record things that happen and any conversations you had. Try to maintain the role of observer rather than participating too much with the children. Do not use cameras, video recorders or tape recorders. This type of data gathering requires different preparation and analysis which is not included in this unit of study.
4b) After each visit read over your field notes (i.e. what actually happened). Take some time to then reflect on what you think you saw and how that relates to some of the course materials. (There is more information on that below). Using the heading ‘Reflection from visit 1′ etc. you will then post in the blog your thoughts, questions, wonderings, assumptions, changes in perceptions etc. You are likely to observe both positive and negative issues impacting the family.

5. For a later visit, prepare some questions and talk with the parents in a semi-formal interview about the key issues for the family and discuss this in an open, non-judgemental manner. You will need to take notes during this session. Many of these questions can be formulated in your small study group. You can add your own specific questions that relate to your family to this list.

6. Conduct a closing session with the family and give them or send a follow up thank you letter and possibly an appropriate, reusable, healthy gift that the whole family will use (e.g. seeds for the garden, potplant, kitchen sprouts or herb growing kit)

A special note: Confidentiality
At all times the privacy of the family and centre the children attend must be protected. In order to protect the identity of participants, and to ensure them of your confidentiality, you must not discuss the details using the participants’ real names. In the journal writing it is best to use substitute names for the parents and the children rather than the first letter of their name or a number. This enhances the presentation of your work. You need to make a statement at the start of the journal and your final submission explaining that you have done this.
The assessable components of the Family Case Study are outlined below.
To complete this Assessment Task you should:
1. Keep a journal in This personal, reflective journal will detail pertinent experiences with the family (using pseudonyms), and other relationships you have observed and experienced during the case study – your observations, the conversations, your thoughts, your feelings, surprises, challenges, wonderings, assumptions, etc.
An important feature of the assessment for this unit requires that you demonstrate abilities for developing appropriate relationships with families. One effective mechanism for you to demonstrate these abilities is in the form of a detailed personal, reflective journal. You will need to follow the guidelines suggested on page 142 (of the article) entitled ‘Parent/Staff Relationships’ (a’Beckett, 1988). The section entitled ‘Examination of Personal Attitudes’ provides a guide.
2. When you have completed your visits with the family, revisit your journal writing.
Recursive journaling is a technique by which you reread your journal entries and look for any patterns, themes, contradictions, etc. which then become topics to explore further by drawing upon the literature in the Unit and perhaps doing further personal writing as you explore these topics. How do the developing themes relate to the theories of families? How do the developing themes fit in with what you learnt in the modules that they relate to (not all modules)?

3. Publish a final assessable piece of recursive writing (essay or another style with an introduction, headings/subheadings, conclusion and reference list)
To achieve a pass in this assignment your recursive writing will need to demonstrate that you can identify and analyse the key issues influencing the family you are studying. The recursive writing can be written in ‘first person’ (e.g. I found that ….) and will demonstrate confirmed or new perspectives and ideas that you have on the topic.
The recursive writing needs to demonstrate that you are both proactive and sensitive in your understanding of the diversity of families in Australia today. Your identification and explanation of the family type that your family represents will provide an opportunity for you to demonstrate your sensitive understanding of family diversity. You will highlight key points from observations of the family and discuss the links between the selected family and their friends and extended family.
you will choose around 3-4 to issues discuss in more depth. Include information about any changes in your appreciation of the issues that families face and changes that have refined your interactions with parents. Explain how these interactions are more appropriate. Also include a comparison between your experiences during the case study and the material detailed in the article by Bartlett et al. (1997) in eReserve. This should be about 2 paragraphs (minimum).
You will need to use a minimum of eight references from the readings from the Learning Modules, as well as ADDITIONAL literature you find helpful and appropriate. Consider some of the small research tasks you have conducted in your small study groups and in your reflection blog.
FORMAT:
The format of the document is up to you. (It does not have to be a word document.)
** Ensure you include a title page for your Assignment with a word count and adhere to APA referencing.
Summary of submissions:
1. Private journal – 4 – 5 reflections (journal) about each of your visits – no word count toward the recursive writing. You may also use this space to record the interview and other information. We will be checking you have done this on Moodle, but you will need to submit a copy of it in your appendix as outlined below. There should be two parts: field notes about what actually happened for each visit that is recorded soon after the visit, then another entry for each visit that is a reflection about what you observed and have thought about since the visit. This space does not need to contain formal academic writing. These are your notes and I will be reading them in order to see that you have done the practical part of the assignment and to see how you have identified the main themes in your reflective writing.
1500-1700 words recursive writing (essay or another style) PLUS appendices.
The appendices will include:
• private blog entries cut and pasted (including field notes, reflections, family background,
• interview questions and answers typed together for easy reading,
• unsigned copy of the consent letter and form,
• reflections from the 8 modules which show your learnings from the unit (these do not need to be polished pieces of writing, just evidence that you have interacted with the modules in brief dot point form)
• thank you letter, etc
N.B. Appendices do not have a word count in academic writing and are not included in the word count of 1500 for the essay.
The marking rubric is in the assignment section and will help you make sure you are covering all of the areas above. It will also show you how marks are awarded.

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